(un)common ground

a commonplace book

What a Book Says and What It Means

Books are not made to be believed, but to be subjected to inquiry. When we consider a book, we mustn’t ask ourselves what it says but what it means.

Umberto Eco, The Name of the Rose (1980)

Notes:
Hence the reason for literary theory and criticism, its active arm. And, for Eco, the reason for semiotics as a part of the process of mapping legitimate suspicion of what we see in front of us. As William of Baskerville is characterized before we even get a word of dialogue, he abides by a lingering suspicion of all appearances.

 

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This entry was posted on March 30, 2016 by and tagged , , .
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